Shoes

(Courtney Pedroza/DD)

(Courtney Pedroza/DD)

Film photography is a lost art. It’s hard work but the results are worth it. This summer, Phoenix College has offered a photography class where these skills are taught. I am a part of this class and as a result I have learned how to develop and process my own film.

I shoot with a Nikon F camera, which takes 35mm film. I was at Songbird Coffee & Tea House getting coffee before class when I noticed this gentleman’s shoes. I took out my telephoto lens and photographed his feet with a focal length of 200mm (I wanted to appear less creepy). The soles of the shoes were blue, but since I only develop black and white, the film transformed the blue to the corresponding gray when I developed the photo.

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Comicon

(Photos by Becky Brisley and Kimberly Koerth)

Thousands of fans of all ages descended on the Phoenix Convention Center this weekend for Phoenix Comicon, a four-day event celebrating everything science fiction: from comic books and anime to video games and films. The convention featured panel discussions; signings and photo opportunities with famous actors, writers, and other celebrities; and hundreds of exhibitor booths. Many people came dressed in cosplay costumes — some of which were homemade — of their favorite characters. Common sights included Marvel and DC superheroes, characters from the shows Doctor Who and Supernatural, and even a few throwbacks to films such as “Ghostbusters” and “Beetlejuice.”

Contact the editor at courtney.pedroza@gmail.com

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My Hood

(Amanda LaCasse/DD)

(Amanda LaCasse/DD)

Jobot makes me feel at home much like holding my dad’s old Nikon N6006 does. Both smell a little musty. Both bring me comfort. Both collided this spring.

The first assignment for my film photography class was nothing short of a spiritual experience, a journey of sorts. The assignment was to shoot “My Hood,” or the neighborhood I consider to be my home. It was a way for all members of the class to get used to shooting film in a manual setting.

After walking around downtown, shooting photos of Taylor Place, my roommate, Fifth Street and the outside of buildings, I realized that the exteriors of my neighborhood weren’t what made it unique.

I walked inside Jobot and looked around after ordering a drink. I realized how much of a home Jobot has been for me ever since I started college. It has been the location of late-night conversations, discussions about music and art. The place of countless homework parties and hours spent reading books. My home away from home.

I took in my surroundings and realized Jobot stands as a strong symbol of what my neighborhood is all about: being fed, feeling accepted and receiving exactly what is needed. On a whim, I held my camera still as the shutter remained open as long as it took to capture this defining moment inside Jobot.

Contact the photographer at alacasse@asu.edu

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Tilt

(Tyler Klaus/DD)

(Tyler Klaus/DD)

I have always loved tilt-shift photography. Tilt-shift photography makes everything look smaller then what it really is. Tilt-shift uses a special type of lens to turn something like a regular street and make it look like it is a play set for little kids.

I have always wanted to do tilt-shift photography, and when my friend offered me her lensbaby, I jumped at the chance. While the lens I used isn’t a true tilt-shift lens, it still gives the photo the same look.

I went to different parking garages in Downtown Phoenix and took pictures of everything from streets to Civic Space Park to ASU Downtown, just trying to make big old Phoenix look a little smaller.

(Tyler Klaus/DD)

(Tyler Klaus/DD)

Contact the photographer at tyler@tylerklaus.com

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The Brick

(Courtney Pedroza/DD)

(Courtney Pedroza/DD)

A couple months ago, I wandered into Green Haus. While I was there, I immediately went to the vintage film cameras. They had an Argus C3 that caught my eye. I ended up purchasing it as my first vintage camera. After studying the camera, I learned it is from 1946 and its nickname is “the brick.” After finding an old roll of film, I decided to test it out.

Wandering around the dorm, I went from friend to friend, taking photos of them. Holding up the brick, I started thinking about how many people before me had done the same thing with this camera. Taking the photo was actually very difficult. I had to guess the distance between the subject and me to focus it without actually seeing it through the viewfinder. Then, without testing or seeing it, I had to adjust the shutter speed to match the aperture. The process was difficult, but I believe it was worth it and worked out.

Contact the photographer at courtney.pedroza@gmail.com

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Lacrosse

(Courtney Pedroza/DD)

(Courtney Pedroza/DD)

Tuesday was my little brother’s lacrosse game. Because I live downtown, I don’t get to see him play all that often, so when my mother told me he had a game in my neck of the woods, I couldn’t resist. His team, the Horizon Huskies, played a hard game against Brophy and ended up losing, but that didn’t stop me from taking photos of the boys playing.

Shooting sports is hard in general. Everything is fast — you have to anticipate and be quick when you do. Since the game was at night, they had bright lights shining on the field to contrast the pitch-black around us. As bright as these were, I couldn’t raise my shutter speed past 1/200th of a second, which made it tricky to capture the game. My aperture was f/5.4, and that was as low as I could make it with a focal length of 300mm.

Contact the photographer at courtney.pedroza@gmail.com

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Blood Moon

(Courtney Pedroza/DD)

(Courtney Pedroza/DD)

Every so often, the Earth moves between the sun and the moon to create a lunar eclipse. This was the first of four “blood moons” that will occur in the next two years, all of which will be visible from North America. As people across Phoenix and the rest of the country looked skyward, I grabbed my camera and tripod to see if I could capture it.

Luckily, I was able to borrow my friend’s 70-300mm telephoto lens so I could really zoom in to the moon. To get the photo of the eclipse, I couldn’t have too low of a shutter speed or else it would glow, so I experimented a bit and found the proper settings. The settings that worked for me were a shutter speed of half of a second with an aperture of 5.6/f.

Contact the photographer at courtney.pedroza@gmail.com

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Downtown

(Amanda LaCasse/DD)

(Amanda LaCasse/DD)

I’ve always admired the Walter Cronkite School building. Even before I attended ASU, I took notice of the corrugated orange, maroon and gold plated walls and hoped to someday set foot inside. Little did I know I would eventually be a student here.

(Amanda LaCasse/DD)

(Amanda LaCasse/DD)

Modified Arts is one of my favorite galleries on Roosevelt. The short brick building walls, angled glass windows and light pole covered in flyers for local shows frames the view looking east — a gateway to many other galleries as well as Fifth Street.

(Amanda LaCasse/DD)

(Amanda LaCasse/DD)

If you ever talk to me, I’ll tell you one of the reasons I love downtown Phoenix so much is the budding art scene. It’s no secret — Roosevelt Row is the predominant arts destination downtown, and I seriously hope there are immaculate blue skies ahead for this area.

(Amanda LaCasse/DD)

(Amanda LaCasse/DD)

Good things start small. I found this tiny plant outside of Growhouse and wanted to use it as a symbol of where the downtown area once was and what it is growing into.

(Amanda LaCasse/DD)

(Amanda LaCasse/DD)

The Phoenix Public Market has been around in one form or another for quite a while. I remember the local vegetables and foods available when it was a local grocer, how sad I was when I heard it was closing and how joyful I was when I learned it would be opening again as a cafe. It is an icon in downtown Phoenix, and I am excited to see what comes of it in the future.

(Amanda LaCasse/DD)

(Amanda LaCasse/DD)

Downtown Phoenix doesn’t have the most memorable skyline at night, but looking at it from the north in the day, I am able to see palm trees, street art, the Cronkite building and skyscrapers behind it. These landmarks all remind me that downtown Phoenix is where I feel most at home.

Contact the photographer at alacasse@asu.edu

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My Little Big Dog

(Samantha Tomasch/DD)

(Samantha Tomasch/DD)

When my model and I set out on an adventure to take some forced perspective pictures, neither of us realized how difficult the task would become. Just coming up with even one idea is hard enough, and then it had to be elegantly executed. Or perhaps this optical illusion trick is easier for people more creative than my model and I.

After walking around much of downtown, we noticed some stone statues in the Mercado. I had my model stand close to me and my camera, with this stone dog on the railing of a staircase far away. With her hand up in midair, it took a few tries to get the placement just right. But with a shutter speed of 1/160th of a second and an aperture of f/9.0 (basically the “auto flash off” function on my camera), we finally got the winning shot.

Contact the photographer at stomasch@asu.edu

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River

(Courtney Pedroza/DD)

(Courtney Pedroza/DD)

(Courtney Pedroza/DD)

(Courtney Pedroza/DD)

On First Friday, March 7, I was walking around with my camera, looking at the interesting subjects around me and waiting to snap a photo. After taking a few pictures, I chose to head back home, and it was when I was walking back that I met River. I heard the song “Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star,” and when I looked for the sound, I saw this 8-year-old boy. It was River, playing his violin in a dirt lot for tips. I swung my camera to my back and started a conversation with the boy and his mom.

River was shy, but after talking, I asked him if I could take his photo while he played — he agreed and began the song. There was only a streetlight across the road shining onto his music sheet and him. Photographing him was challenging, but I changed my aperture to f/1.8 and my shutter speed to 1/40th of a second. With those settings I was able to capture River’s motions while he played “Twinkle, Twinkle, Little Star.”

Contact the photographer at courtney.pedroza@gmail.com

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